See the Signs & Speak Out: Become A Bystander

Publish Date: 
2015
Media Type: 
Category: 

See The Signs & Speak Out: Become an Upstander series includes three new employer training programs aimed at educating employees on how to recognize and respond to abuse. Materials were designed to further public conversation about domestic violence, dating violence and sexual assault and to encourage safe and effective bystander interventions to reduce violence and assault. ​

This free training series includes accessible online tools that will help bystanders who witness or suspect abuse to take action and safely intervene. Visit the website to view online bystander intervention courses that come with certificate of completion; video vignette trainings for both managers and employees; and additional onsite training materials (including downloadable PowerPoint presentations, facilitator’s guide/script, and Quick Start guide.) Trainings are divided into three sessions that raise awareness and provide ideas for taking responsible action and skill building.

From the website: "First, recognize the signs of abuse or violence. Next, start conversations to end the silence around domestic violence and sexual assault in your workplaces, schools, homes, and communities. Respond to help a child, teen, or adult who may be experiencing domestic violence, dating abuse or sexual assault. Then, take action in your life to help end the violence."

Visit the website for instructions on how to access the courses. Courses are designed for both employers and employees. A guide for facilitating an in-person training is also available.

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