Resistance 101

Publish Date: 
2017
Media Type: 
Category: 

This lesson has been prepared by Teaching for Change staff for teachers to use for Inauguration Teach-Ins and beyond. It is an introductory lesson for students, allowing them to “meet” people from throughout U.S. history who have resisted injustice and to learn from the range of social change strategies they have used. The lesson features activists from the 1800s to the present and is based on a Rethinking Schools lesson called ‘Unsung Heroes.’

Designed to introduce a history of resistance to injustice, Resistance 101 is appropriate for middle and high school classes and can be expanded, built upon and tailored to complement established curricula.

 

Free download available on website. Visit Teaching for Change for facilitation tips and other similar activities that nurture social justice activism and civic engagement.

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